The Hidden Symptoms of Stress Cardiomyopathy: How to Identify and Treat Them

To uncover the subtler aspects of stress cardiomyopathy1, also known as broken heart syndrome, we’ve gathered insights from six experts, including Founders and a Senior Coach. From the potential danger of having shortness of breath to addressing the underlying stress causing nausea2, these leaders delve into the overlooked symptoms of stress cardiomyopathy and methods to alleviate these symptoms.

  • Shortness of Breath: Potentially Dangerous
  • Fatigue: Recognize and Recover
  • Skin Changes: Signal Early Detection
  • Jaw Pain: Symptom and Treatment
  • Emotional Numbness: Mindfulness and Counseling
  • Nausea: Address Underlying Stress

Fatigue: Recognize and Recover

James Cunningham, Senior Coach, Total Shape

James Cunningham, Senior Coach, Total Shape

One overlooked symptom of stress cardiomyopathy is fatigue, which is a feeling of tiredness, weakness, or exhaustion that does not go away with rest. Fatigue can be dangerous, as it can affect the physical, mental, and emotional health of the person and impair their ability to perform daily activities and cope with stress. Fatigue can also be a sign of other underlying health problems, such as anemia, thyroid disorders, or heart failure.

One way to recover from fatigue caused by stress cardiomyopathy is to seek medical attention and follow the prescribed treatment plan, which may include medications, lifestyle changes, and counseling. 

Another way to recover from fatigue is to practice self-care and stress management, such as getting enough sleep, eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly, staying hydrated, avoiding alcohol and caffeine, and engaging in relaxing and enjoyable activities.

Emotional Numbness: Mindfulness and Counseling

Bayu Prihandito, Certified Psychology Expert, Life Coach, and Founder, Life Architekture

Bayu Prihandito, Certified Psychology Expert, Life Coach, and Founder, Life Architekture

A profound sense of emotional detachment or numbness can occur from this stress cardiomyopathy. This isn’t just feeling sad or blue; it’s an actual disconnection from any emotional response, which can be quite alarming. Over time, this emotional flatlining can disrupt personal relationships and hinder individuals from seeking help or recognizing the severity of their condition.

In terms of recovery, it often involves a combination of professional counseling 3and personal mindfulness practices. In my work, I emphasize the importance of acknowledging these feelings without judgment and engaging in activities that help reconnect with your emotions, such as meditation, painting, or journaling, and also in regaining a sense of control and resilience.

Skin Changes: Signal Early Detection

Roy Lau, Co-Founder, 28 Mortgage.

Roy Lau, Co-Founder, 28 Mortgage

Skin changes, such as rashes, hives, or increased sensitivity, are an often-overlooked symptom of stress cardiomyopathy. These skin issues can be mistakenly attributed to allergies, environmental factors, or unrelated conditions. 

Raising awareness about this symptom is crucial for early detection. While stress cardiomyopathy can be dangerous, recovery involves addressing the underlying stress, adopting stress-management techniques, and following a personalized treatment plan prescribed by a healthcare professional.

Jaw Pain: Symptom and Treatment

Ben Lau, Founder, Featured SEO Company

Ben Lau, Founder, Featured SEO Company

Jaw pain is an often-overlooked symptom of stress cardiomyopathy and it can be mistaken for dental issues or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders4, leading to a delayed diagnosis. 

Stress cardiomyopathy can be dangerous, as it can lead to severe heart complications if left untreated. Recovery involves addressing the underlying stress, medical treatment, and lifestyle changes like stress-reduction techniques, exercise, and a heart-healthy diet.

  1. Templin, Christian, et al. “Clinical features and outcomes of takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy.” New England Journal of Medicine 373.10 (2015): 929-938. ↩︎
  2. Otto, Bärbel, et al. “Endocrine correlates of acute nausea and vomiting.” Autonomic Neuroscience 129.1-2 (2006): 17-21. ↩︎
  3. Hansen, James T., Megan Speciale, and Matthew E. Lemberger. “Humanism: The foundation and future of professional counseling.” The Journal of Humanistic Counseling 53.3 (2014): 170-190. ↩︎
  4. Buescher, Jennifer J. “Temporomandibular joint disorders.” American family physician 76.10 (2007): 1477-1482. ↩︎
  1. Amazing article! It is a must-read for everyone as we do not know what a person is dealing with. If he or she is aware of this symptom and the possible solutions, then; taking treatment properly and at the correct time can be ensured.

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